MyCoffs - A Natural Environment Sustained for the Future

"A Natural Environment sustained for the Future" logo image

Let's protect the diversity of our natural environment.

Let's use resources responsibly to support a safe and stable climate.


Through this page we will provide updates on how we are progressing as a community on the Coffs Harbour Community Strategic Plan objective of 'A Natural Environment Sustained for the Future'.

We will post outcomes, indicators, news and initiatives, however this page is also about YOU! It is an opportunity to share ideas and thoughts on opportunities and issues relating to making the Coffs Harbour region 'A Natural Environment Sustained for the Future'.


You can read more about the MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan here.

Let's protect the diversity of our natural environment.

Let's use resources responsibly to support a safe and stable climate.


Through this page we will provide updates on how we are progressing as a community on the Coffs Harbour Community Strategic Plan objective of 'A Natural Environment Sustained for the Future'.

We will post outcomes, indicators, news and initiatives, however this page is also about YOU! It is an opportunity to share ideas and thoughts on opportunities and issues relating to making the Coffs Harbour region 'A Natural Environment Sustained for the Future'.


You can read more about the MyCoffs Community Strategic Plan here.

  • Plastic Free July

    over 1 year ago
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    Plastic Free July (PFJ) is about avoiding single-use plastics – especially straws, plastic bags, plastic bottles and disposable cutlery and coffee cups.

    Join the PFJ Movement

    Momentum is building all over the world to cut down on single use plastic – so why not start your own revolution in PFJ 2018.

    All you have to do is pledge to cut out the use of single use plastic throughout July and hopefully begin a lifelong habit. Some of the most common items include plastic bags, plastic cutlery, takeaway coffee cups, plastic straws and plastic drink bottles. These five items are easily...


    Plastic Free July (PFJ) is about avoiding single-use plastics – especially straws, plastic bags, plastic bottles and disposable cutlery and coffee cups.

    Join the PFJ Movement

    Momentum is building all over the world to cut down on single use plastic – so why not start your own revolution in PFJ 2018.

    All you have to do is pledge to cut out the use of single use plastic throughout July and hopefully begin a lifelong habit. Some of the most common items include plastic bags, plastic cutlery, takeaway coffee cups, plastic straws and plastic drink bottles. These five items are easily replaced with alternatives like canvas bags, a reusable coffee cup, bamboo or steel cutlery, a steel or reusable drinking bottle and going without a straw.

    Plastic is a durable, incredibly long-lasting material, so when it gets thrown away, it begins its journey to our waterways, beaches and oceans where it slowly, very slowly, begins to break down into millions of pieces. Recent research by Tangaroa Blue, an Australian Marine Debris Initiative, estimates that eight million tonnes of plastic are entering the ocean each year, making marine debris a major environmental issue worldwide.

    This July, Council is helping people get involved by running a packed programme of events including DIY beeswax wrap workshops, Solitary Islands Coastal Walks, film screenings at the Jetty Memorial Theatre, a plastic free shopping tour, a giant Used Toy Swap, a ‘Repurposing Our Plastics’ Exhibition and more.

    Find out more about how you can be involved at: http://www.ourlivingcoast.com.au/plastic-free-july
  • COFFS COAST BUSINESSES CHALLENGE CONSUMERS TO FIND ALTERNATIVES TO PLASTIC

    over 1 year ago
    Plastics summit image 2

    In the lead up to Plastic Free July, Coffs Coast businesses are challenging consumers to say no to single use bags. They’re working with council to educate consumers on sustainable alternatives.

    Watch the latest news story from NBN: http://www.nbnnews.com.au/2018/03/06/coffs-coast-businesses-challenge-consumers-to-find-alternatives-to-plastic/


    In the lead up to Plastic Free July, Coffs Coast businesses are challenging consumers to say no to single use bags. They’re working with council to educate consumers on sustainable alternatives.

    Watch the latest news story from NBN: http://www.nbnnews.com.au/2018/03/06/coffs-coast-businesses-challenge-consumers-to-find-alternatives-to-plastic/


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  • Join the #zerowaste revolution

    over 1 year ago
    Every individual matters plastics summitt
    A growing number of everyday champions have made a pledge to decrease the amount of waste they generate. This positive #zerowaste trend that is gaining popularity is not only good for the pocket and the environment, but is unleashing a creative side for many of the converted.

    Want to join the revolution? Head over to the Our Living Coast website and check out the ten step cheat sheet to get you started! http://www.ourlivingcoast.com.au/join-zerowaste-revolution/

    A growing number of everyday champions have made a pledge to decrease the amount of waste they generate. This positive #zerowaste trend that is gaining popularity is not only good for the pocket and the environment, but is unleashing a creative side for many of the converted.

    Want to join the revolution? Head over to the Our Living Coast website and check out the ten step cheat sheet to get you started! http://www.ourlivingcoast.com.au/join-zerowaste-revolution/

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  • Dutch supermarket introduces world-first plastic-free aisle

    over 1 year ago
    Plastic free 1

    An upmarket brand of supermarkets found across The Netherlands is making news this week for introducing a totally plastic-free aisle for environmentally-conscious shoppers, in collaboration with UK-based grassroots organisation a Plastic Planet.

    In a world first, everything in the Amsterdam branch aisle (regular groceries like meats, rice, sauces, cereals, chocolate and even fruit and vegetables) is packaged either in recyclable or compostable materials, like glass, metal and cardboard.

    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/feb/28/worlds-first-plastic-free-aisle-opens-in-netherlands-supermarket


    An upmarket brand of supermarkets found across The Netherlands is making news this week for introducing a totally plastic-free aisle for environmentally-conscious shoppers, in collaboration with UK-based grassroots organisation a Plastic Planet.

    In a world first, everything in the Amsterdam branch aisle (regular groceries like meats, rice, sauces, cereals, chocolate and even fruit and vegetables) is packaged either in recyclable or compostable materials, like glass, metal and cardboard.

    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/feb/28/worlds-first-plastic-free-aisle-opens-in-netherlands-supermarket


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  • Queen Elizabeth II bans plastics from royal estates

    over 1 year ago
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    Buckingham Palace has outlined new waste plans and said there was a ‘strong desire to tackle the issue’ at the highest levels of the Royal household.

    The new measures include gradually phasing out plastic straws in public cafes and banning them altogether in staff dining rooms.

    Internal caterers at Buckingham Palace, Windsor Castle, and the Palace of Holyroodhouse in Edinburgh will now only be allowed to use china plates and glasses, or recyclable paper cups.

    Takeaway food items in the Royal Collection cafes must also now be made of compostable or biodegradable packaging.


    Buckingham Palace has outlined new waste plans and said there was a ‘strong desire to tackle the issue’ at the highest levels of the Royal household.

    The new measures include gradually phasing out plastic straws in public cafes and banning them altogether in staff dining rooms.

    Internal caterers at Buckingham Palace, Windsor Castle, and the Palace of Holyroodhouse in Edinburgh will now only be allowed to use china plates and glasses, or recyclable paper cups.

    Takeaway food items in the Royal Collection cafes must also now be made of compostable or biodegradable packaging.


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  • Woolworths And Coles Ban Single-Use Plastic Bags From July 2018

    about 2 years ago

    Supermarkets, Woolworth and Coles, have both announced plans to phase out single-use plastic bags over the next twelve months.

    Woolworths and Coles have confirmed that from July 1 2018, its customers will need to bring their own bags when they go shopping or purchase re-usable ones in-store.

    Shoppers in NSW, Victoria and Western Australia will be affected by the ban. South Australian, Northern Territory and Tasmanian governments have already implemented state-wide plastic bag bans, and a ban in Queensland is already planned for 2018.

    Around 8.6 billion kilograms of plastic waste ends up in our oceans every year. With less than 4% of plastic bags being recycled in Australia, they are a major contributor to this waste.

    Supermarkets, Woolworth and Coles, have both announced plans to phase out single-use plastic bags over the next twelve months.

    Woolworths and Coles have confirmed that from July 1 2018, its customers will need to bring their own bags when they go shopping or purchase re-usable ones in-store.

    Shoppers in NSW, Victoria and Western Australia will be affected by the ban. South Australian, Northern Territory and Tasmanian governments have already implemented state-wide plastic bag bans, and a ban in Queensland is already planned for 2018.

    Around 8.6 billion kilograms of plastic waste ends up in our oceans every year. With less than 4% of plastic bags being recycled in Australia, they are a major contributor to this waste.

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